What Was Hitler’s Foreign Policy (1933-39) – Best Information

What Was Hitler’s Foreign Policy | Hitler’s Foreign Policy | Nazi Foreign Policy | What Was The Foreign Policy Of Hitler |

What Was Hitler’s Foreign Policy

Hitler’s Foreign Policy: Hitler wrote in his autobiography, Mein Kampf, that in order to survive on the earth, one must fight because the constant struggle is the only mantra for survival. That is to say, war and aggression are the mainstays of his foreign policy.

What Was Hitler's Foreign Policy
Hitler’s Foreign Policy

What Was The Foreign Policy Of Hitler

The same policy that the Nazi party adopted in governing the country’s internal affairs was applied in foreign affairs. This policy had two faces. On the one hand not to go to any compromise and on the other hand to rely on force. Following this pattern, the Nazi party government began denying all treaties and agreements signed by the previous government. As a result, the Nazi government refused to comply with Germany’s obligations under the treaty. European politics suddenly became heated as they blocked all talks. But just as the Nazis took advantage of the opposition’s lack of specific tactics at home, they successfully exploited other states’ ambiguities in foreign affairs.

The declared intentions of the Nazi Party in this episode were surprising. They declared that Germany was not interested in invading any other state. But other states should not interfere in Germany’s military preparations. So in just seven years, Germany’s rise to power as one of the major powers in Europe and the world has been to the credit of other powerful nations. Surprisingly, the responsibility for maintaining peace in Europe rested on the shoulders of those powerful nations. As a result, there was no difficulty in increasing the aggressive attitude of the Nazis.

Hitler believed that Western civilization was in decline and that it was the duty of the German nation to change that. For example, in the past, the Germans started a very dynamic culture by destroying the Roman Empire.

Hitler's Foreign Policy
Nazi foreign policy

In his autobiography, written in 1924, Hitler identified France as Germany’s main enemy and decided that Germany’s eastern frontier should be merged with the German-speaking territories to form a greater Germany. After coming to power, Hitler formulated his foreign policy with these two goals in mind. He understood that Germany had become an enemy of Britain in order to expand its naval power. In this case, he abandoned the idea of ​​being equal to Britain and introduced infinite realism.

Hitler’s Foreign Policy

In 1932, people generally believed that the fall of Germany was imminent. 70 Lakh unemployed in Germany then; Germany’s reserves are zero and its foreign trade is declining. Hitler became Chancellor on January 30, 1933, and rapidly transformed Germany. But on examination, it is seen that he followed the measures taken by his predecessors and did nothing new. Probably because he was born in Austria, he was so keen on Austria’s annexation with Germany, and a search for historical reasons reveals that he hated the Pauls for the same reason.

Many historians, however, do not agree with this interpretation. Because Hitler was a master planner who destroyed civilization through world wars and established his own dictatorship. Hugh Trevor-Roper, the afastone to y panta (Elizabeth Wiskemenn), and Allan Bullock * all cited historical Hitler-inspired systems as the cause of World War II. Because Hitler wanted to arouse German nationalism by creating a feeling of racism, which could not be a rational policy. We know that the Jews were the target of his attack. Similarly, non-Jewish Russians and Pauls are described as Untermenschen.

It could be said that it was out of anti-Semitism that Hitler demanded new territories for the settlement of the German nation. That region will be east of Russia. Hitler has always identified Russia as an international Jewish conspiracy.

Hitler’s Foreign Policy

The expansion of Germany to the East would not only strengthen the German nation but would also destroy all Jewish conspiracies and uproot the poisonous tree of Marxism. Germany abruptly rejected the Treaty of Versailles, announcing the cancellation of all changes to the map of Europe under the terms of the treaty. Germany did not stop there. In October 1933, Germany decided to leave the League. As a result, Germany slipped out of international surveillance and control.

It should be noted that since the 1920s, Hitler has been condemning the Treaty of Versailles and the activities of the League. Hitler’s demands for governing the whole of Europe were far greater than the amendment of the Treaty of Versailles. He asserted that his country’s population was growing at an alarming rate and that its territory was being dismantled under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. Therefore he wants a habitable land (Lebensraum).

This land can be obtained by undermining Russia’s authority in the east. The establishment of the German Empire in Europe meant the establishment of authority over Russia and its border states. Hitler firmly believed that Bolshevik Russia would not last long. The Slavs were somehow incapable of forming their own state. (Hitler, therefore, wanted to conquer France first as a first step in the eastern campaign. On the other hand, he surrendered Italy to the South Tyrol and tried to win it over.

Neighboring states must have kept an eye on Hitler‘s hot speeches and his aggressive attitude towards domestic politics. Hitler knew full well that his main motive could be to thwart a hasty decision. So to the shock of the whole world, in January 1934, he abruptly signed a non-aggression pact with Poland. The main thorn in the side of post-war Germany was the loss of Posen, East Prussia, and Upper Silesia to Poland. The Polish Corridor separates the port of Danzig and East Prussia from the rest of Germany. It was through this arrangement that France carried out its plan to encircle Germany.

After Hitler came to power, Joseph Pilsudski, the head of state and warlord of Poland, proposed a German invasion of France. But he was disappointed that the French attitude was negative. The moment Hitler proposed a non-aggression pact with Poland, Pilsudski agreed to it. With this agreement, Hitler ruled out the possibility of invading Germany from the Polish side. That’s how he killed two birds at once. First, anti-German military initiatives between France and Poland were blocked, and second, the prospect of a coalition initiative against Bolshevik Russia in Europe was brightened.

Hitler's Foreign Policy
Hitler’s Foreign Policy

This time Hitler began to look at Germany’s military might. In March 1935, compulsory military training for adult males was introduced in Germany. At the same time, however, it was declared that Germany was not keen on the Grassroots and that Germany’s goal was self-defense. But in a short period of time, the policy of self-defense did not allow Germany to swallow the three neighboring states.

Britain and France protested against Germany’s behavior. Italy protested in the same way, but Germany did not listen. His only argument was the conditions imposed on him unilaterally at Versailles. Germany just wants to revise them. It turned out that public opinion had not yet developed in Europe in response to Hitler’s aggressive foreign and defense policy.

When Italy invaded Abyssinia in 1936, the League and its two main driving forces, Britain and France, became deeply involved. Germany on that occasion. Lacano publicly declares his intention to violate the terms of the agreement. His main argument was that the treaty had already been ratified by France and Russia. Germany did not stop there. In violation of the Treaty of Versailles, he assembled troops on German soil on the left bank of the Rhine. Under the terms of the agreement, any military activity in the area was prohibited. Naturally, Germany’s move sparked a storm of criticism across Europe.

But nothing happened except verbal protests, so Hitler assumed that there was no one left in Europe to stop him. But his colleagues do not seem to be particularly sure of what Hitler wanted. However, many believe that by 1936, Hitler’s foreign policy was designed to meet four goals. They were,

(1) Restoration of the lost military glory of Germany

(2) Expansion of German state borders

(3) the unification of the German nation (volksdeutsche ‘) everywhere and

(4) The formation of the ‘Lebensraum’, the common German mainly in Eastern Europe. In this case, Hitler was ready to engage in the necessary conflict with Bolshevik Russia. Hitler described these goals as the “idealism” of his politics. However, instead of pursuing that goal, he waited for the opportunity to take advantage of the opportunity, so he used the opportunity to start a new military preparation in the Rhine. But he called for “expansion” to the east or “invasion” by Russia.

What Was The Foreign Policy Of Hitler

FAQs

Q. Hitler Autobiography name?

A. Hitler wrote in his autobiography, Mein Kampf.

Q. What did Hitler write in his autobiography?

A. Hitler wrote in his autobiography, Mein Kampf, that in order to survive on the earth, one must fight because the constant struggle is the only mantra for survival. That is to say, war and aggression are the mainstays of his foreign policy.

Q. Hitler’s foreign policy four goals?

A. (1) Restoration of the lost military glory of Germany. (2) Expansion of German state borders. (3) the unification of the German nation everywhere. (4) The formation of the ‘Lebensraum’, the common German mainly in Eastern Europe. In this case, Hitler was ready to engage in the necessary conflict with Bolshevik Russia.

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